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Kernel Log: Ceph file system in 2.6.34, kernel and KVM presentations at the CLT2010

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Linus Torvalds has integrated the Ceph distributed network file system and released the second release candidate of 2.6.34. Torvalds intends to vary the length of the merge window from now on. Slides of the presentations at the Chemnitz Linux Days provide background information about kernel and KVM topics. Ubuntu has been given an AMD graphics driver which cooperates with series 1.7 X Servers.

When he released the first RC of 2.6.34 early, which surprised many subsystem maintainers, Linus Torvalds announced that he might still integrate the Ceph distributed network file system, which didn't make it into 2.6.33, although the merge window had already closed. He did this last weekend and, shortly afterwards, released Linux 2.6.24-rc2 – the usual release email for the new version has not so far appeared on the LKML.

Licensed under the LGPL, Ceph is a "Distributed Network File System" which, according to the developers, can manage data on a petabyte scale "and beyond", it is robust and offers numerous functions that are missing in other similar open source file systems. Detailed information about Ceph is available on the project's homepage, in a short description which was integrated into the kernel sources together with the file system code, and in an older article on LWN.net which describes an earlier, Fuse-based version of the file system.

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