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All-in-one PC has dual-core Atom

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Hardware

Shuttle announced a compact, all-in-one PC featuring a 15.6-inch touchscreen and a dual-core Intel Atom D510 available with SUSE Linux. The X50V2 includes a 1366 x 768 display, webcam, 4-in-1 card reader, a 2.5-inch hard drive bay, and up to 4GB of RAM, says the company.

The X50V2 resembles Shuttle's recently announced XS35 desktop in that it is available in a "barebone" configuration without memory, a hard disk drive (HDD), or operating system. It will also be available preconfigured with 2GB of RAM and a 250GB HDD, loaded with either SUSE Linux or Windows 7 Home Premium.

The X50V (above) includes a 15.6-inch screen with a resolution of 1366 x 768 pixels, offering a resistive touchscreen that is only single-touch capable. The device also has a 1.3 megapixel webcam, a microphone, stereo speakers, plus a "4-in-1" card reader supporting SD, MMC, Memory Stick, and Memory Stick Pro media.

rest here




Odd

Odd looking thing.

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