Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

From the Bubble to the Burst: A Look Back at 25 Years of Dotcom

Filed under
Web

In 1985, the domain name ".com" came into existence, helping to define the modern Internet. Within two years of the registration of the first Internet domain name, major tech corporations such as Intel (Intel.com), Xerox (xerox.com), and Apple (apple.com), along with a host of smaller outfits, had all begun to make their mark on the World Wide Web. Their presence helped give birth to everything from search engines (Google, etc.) to social networks (Facebook, etc.) to a wide variety of online services in the commercial, altruistic, and just-plain-weird realms—or sometimes all three at once (we’re looking at you, Craigslist). The following Websites represent some of the biggest successes, along with some of the most spectacular failures, of the past 25 years. For millions of users, some of these Websites will seem like old and long-gone friends; others continue to dominate the Internet to this day.

View Here




More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Read more

AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API. Read more

Red Hat News

Peppermint 7 Released

Peppermint 7 launched a few days ago. Peppermint is a lightweight Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with an emphasis on speed and simplicity. Although the name is similar to Linux Mint, the projects aren't directly related. Peppermint originally was envisioned as a "spicier" alternative to Mint—whatever that means! Many distros come with a wide assortment of feature-rich applications, and that's great for power users who need those apps. But older machines can struggle to cope with those demanding distros. Peppermint solves the problem by offering a carefully curated suite of web apps that perform tasks traditionally handled by native apps. It's an approach that will be familiar to any Chromebook users reading this article. Read more