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AllPeers: Killer app for Firefox?

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Software

For an application that isn't even publicly available, AllPeers - a Firefox plug-in being developed in Prague - is receiving a great deal of hype. Some are even predicting that this will be Firefox's killer app.

AllPeers is simply a peer-to-peer (P2P) technology that allows you to share digital content with a buddy list. Using Firefox as the front-end, AllPeers says that it will run cross-platform, allowing transfers between Windows, Mac and Linux, and possibly more in the future. And, like Firefox, it's going to be open source.

According to the AllPeers blog, "To overuse the popular cliche, the product is free as in beer in order to encourage people to try it, use it and recommend it to their friends. And it's free as in speech since it will be available in full source code (we haven't finalized the exact wording of the license, but I dare say it will be broadly similar to the Mozilla Public License). Underlying our media sharing functionality is a very powerful platform, and it's our hope that third parties will take advantage of our openness to create additional applications that enrich the entire AllPeers ecosystem."

Full Story.

AllPeers

Anything that could confound RIAA has my full support. However I'm not convinced this application offers any revolutionary functionality. If it allows me to share content with a select group of friends, how is that better or different from simply giving them a login to my ftp server?

In short, sure - it's always nice to have yet another tool in your toolbox. But revolutionary? I hardly think so.

other possibilities

This could be nothing but a nice little convenience OR...it could lead to tiers of user lists, "rooms" and a model based in part on DC. This could be interesting.

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