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Keep Your Cloud, I'm a Customer Not a Consumer

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The cloud hype is getting thicker and smellier every day. All the cloud excitement is coming from those who hope to profit from it, the vendors and breathless tech journalists who can't think of anything worthwhile to write about. They're working very hard to make it sound like a wonderful thing, a miracle of rare device that will transform life as we know it.

In related news, Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, Sasquatch, Yeti, and Elvis are all throwing a fabulous party at Graceland and everyone is invited. If you don't live in Memphis they'll send a private jet to pick you up.

The Cloud is Nonsense

The problem with all this cloud nonsense is it's exactly that--nonsense. Hosted services are nothing new. What would be new and radical and transformative are attractive products reasonably-priced, and good customer service. Those are the missing pieces, and I predict they will always be the missing pieces. Because it seems that among the big players in tech, research and development are devoted entirely to inventing new buzzwords. If it weren't for the small independents we would have nowhere to turn.

Here are three examples to illustrate.




Cloud is a meaningless buzz word

zdnet.com: Just like green IT some 18 months ago, Australian IT services companies and vendors are currently obsessed with cloud computing. And just like green IT, they are explaining it poorly with phrases of marketing guff that often mean nothing.

A prime example of this problem was the speech delivered by local Fujitsu chief Rod Vawdrey at the Kickstart forum on the Gold Coast on Sunday.

The executive announced a new product that Fujitsu calls "Infrastructure as a Service", but didn't initially provide any real details on what it actually was. Take a look for yourself — you can read Fujitsu's press release here.

After a brief speech, Vawdrey was hammered by journalists (including yours truly) who wanted to know exactly what Fujitsu was announcing. What applications would run in the cloud? How was the strategy different from what Fujitsu was already doing? What partners and software were involved?

It can't have been an enjoyable experience for the executive, and the talk at the conference afterwards was disbelief at the lack of clarity.

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