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Nine Linux projects in 90 minutes

Filed under
Linux
Software

Previously we gave you 7 Cool Linux Projects that anyone could do, but if you still have a few hours to kill and you've already watched the latest Maru videos on YouTube, we have the perfect follow-up article for you: read on to discover just how versatile Linux is by trying nine easy projects that should take no longer than the kettle does to boil - learn how to run your own wiki, encrypt files, blog from home, create your own network wormhole and more!

Project 1: Wiki on a Stick

If you fancy taking your own customised pile of documentation and notes wherever you go, there's a perfect solution called Wiki on a Stick. As its name implies, this is a project that offers a go-anywhere web-based wiki that's entirely self-contained, and can be used for all the same things a full fat wiki can. The package is provided as a Zip archive, and after you've unzipped this, usually with a double click, you'll find a single .htm file remains.

This single file is all there is to it. The entire package is a cleverly constructed XHTML file, which uses both JavaScript and CSS to build a complete wiki that works online and offline. Just double-click to load it into your default browser. You're now running the wiki, and everything you need is right in front of you, including the documentation and a guide to getting started with the software.

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