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To Every Operating System ...

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OS

It was an exciting year on the operating system beat, with prominent new releases for every season.

While the proliferation of platform options we've seen this year has made the OS landscape more complicated, this diversity is spurring competition and much-needed innovation.

Fortunately, most of the vendors and projects that made this year so interesting have seized upon openness in the form of free and open-source software-or, failing that, of open standards-as a method for balancing diversity and innovation while maintaining an important layer of compatibility.

As TV's favorite ex-convict might remark, it's a good thing-after all, there's far too much room for improvement in operating systems to leave ourselves parked at 1 [insert vendor name here] Way.

Full Story.

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It's been a little over two weeks since the Solus Project launched the first ISO snapshot of their Linux-based operating system, Solus 2017.01.01.0, but its development team has been engaged in various duties since then. We've already told you about their plans to concentrate on delivering the Linux Driver Management tool that lets users more easily choose and install the perfect drivers for their hardware, as well as the long-anticipated Budgie 11 desktop environment for Q1 2017. Read more

The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17

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Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen

  • Rugged, customizable POS system runs on Braswell
    Advantech’s rugged “UBX-310D” POS computer offers a quad-core, 2.0GHz Celeron J1900, plus SATA, mSATA, and mini-PCIe. Advantech’s UBX-310D is a fanless point of sale computer intended for small countertops and limited-space installations. The shock and vibration resistant device has a modest, 245 x 185 x 45mm footprint. The system runs Windows 7 or 8 as a default, with optional Linux 3.13, and supports applications such as retail, self-service, digital signage, and store management.
  • Open spec, $29 COM shrinks Pine A64 to SODIMM dimensions
    Pine64’s open spec, 67.9 x 31mm “SoPine A64” COM has a quad-core -A53 Allwinner A64 and 2GB RAM, plus an optional baseboard that mimics a Pine A64+ SBC.
  • RetroPie, NES Classic and Bluetooth peripherals
    I wanted to write a more in-depth post about RetroPie the Retro Gaming Appliance OS for Raspberry Pis, either technically or more positively, but unfortunately I don't have much positive to write. What I hoped for was a nice appliance that I could use to play old games from the comfort of my sofa. Unfortunately, nine times out of ten, I had a malfunctioning Linux machine and the time I'd set aside for jumping on goombas was being spent trying to figure out why bluetooth wasn't working. I have enough opportunities for that already, both at work and at home. I feel a little bad complaining about an open source, volunteer project: in its defence I can say that it is iterating fast and the two versions I tried in a relatively short time span were rapidly different. So hopefully a lot of my woes will eventually be fixed. I've also read a lot of other people get on with it just fine. Instead, I decided the Nintendo Classic NES Mini was the plug-and-play appliance for me. Alas, it became the "must have" Christmas toy for 2016 and impossible to obtain for the recommended retail price. I did succeed in finding one in stock at Toys R Us online at one point, only to have the checkout process break and my order not go through. Checking Stock Informer afterwards, that particular window of opportunity was only 5 minutes wide. So no NES classic for me!
  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Extends IoT
    Raspberry Pi Foundation updates embedded Compute Module with faster ARM processor to help developers and businesses build new IoT devices. The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced its new Compute Module 3 (CM3) on Jan. 16, providing internet of things (IoT) device makers with a powerful new option for embedded compute capabilities. The CM3 should not be confused with the Raspberry Pi's namesake device, which had its last major update in February 2016 with the debut of the Raspberry Pi 3 device. The Raspberry Pi is a small form-factor ARM-powered computer that was originally developed in 2012 as a way to help both kids and adults learn about computer science.
  • Smartphone App: Saavn Music app hits the Tizen Store
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Debian News (manpages and TeX Live)

  • manpages.debian.org has been modernized (2017-01-18)
    https://manpages.debian.org has been modernized! We have just launched a major update to our manpage repository. What used to be served via a CGI script is now a statically generated website, and therefore blazingly fast. While we were at it, we have restructured the paths so that we can serve all manpages, even those whose name conflicts with other binary packages (e.g. crontab(5) from cron, bcron or systemd-cron). Don’t worry: the old URLs are redirected correctly.
  • Debian/TeX Live January 2017
    As the freeze of the next release is closing in, I have updated a bunch of packages around TeX: All of the TeX Live packages (binaries and arch independent ones) and tex-common. I might see whether I get some updates of ConTeXt out, too.