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OpenSource Operating Systems

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OS

I figured that I should take an opportunity to introduce a few opensource OSs that really haven't been in the lime light much. We all know about Linux and many of us also know about Darwin and BSD. Still some know about OpenSolaris. Which ever ones you know or don't here's a chance to get the scoop.

GNU/Linux

No. I am not talking about a wildebeest. On September 27th of 1983, Richard Stallman began the GNU operating system project. By 1990, he still lacked a decent working kernel for that operating system. In 1991, a guy in Helsinki named Linus Torvalds had that kernel available in the form of Linux. What Torvalds needed Stallman had. By 2000, Linux was available in over 300 distributions with varying components of the GNU project, and was the darling of the OpenSource movement, and the second most popular UNIX variant around.

Darwin/OSX

When Steve Jobs left Apple in the 80s, many wondered what he would do. The 80s have come and gone, and we now know the he started NeXT... which wasn't all that successful. When NeXT did do, was create a BSD variant that has been very successful. Apple was trying to reinvent its OS, and was failing miserably. Steve brought OPENSTEP to Apple, and it was reinvented as Darwin.

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KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

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