Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hacking HTC's Windows CE phones with Linux

Filed under
Sci/Tech

There is a curious lack in the Linux community -- the number of community-led Linux distributions for commodity mobile phone hardware is zero. There are PDAs for which you can get a GSM/GPRS SD card; there are mobile phones, such as the Motorola A780, that are based on Linux; and there is even the OpenEZX project, which aims to take Motorola's original kernel source for the E680 and A780 Linux phones as the basis for an entirely free-software phone distribution. But there just simply aren't any completed and entirely free Linux distributions, with complete source code, for any commodity mobile phones.

As reported two years ago by LinuxDevices.com, the aim of the Xanadux project is to change that, and this article describes how it's getting on. The devices are the secretive High Tech Computer Corporation's (HTC's) "Designed for Windows CE" PDA phones, which have several codenames -- Wallaby, Himalaya, Blue Angel, Universal, and Magician, to name most of them. They are known by several names -- O2 calls them XDAs, T-Mobile calls them MDAs, and they also go by brand names such as iMate's JasJar.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Ask Safia: How do I move from a proprietary software background into open source?

Your inexperience with open source tools definitely is not going to prevent you from participating in the open source community. Regardless of the closed nature of the platforms that you’ve worked with previously, you have all the skills needed to be a valuable open source contributor. If you’ve learned a thing or two about documentation, consider addressing documentation issues on projects. If you had experience in QA or testing, you can start off by user testing the software and identifying areas for improvement or for improving code coverage. Valuing your skill set and the nature of the environments that you have worked in is important. Read more

How Do You Support Your Distro?

I think of them as our own little personal supernovas. There’s a brilliant flash when a Linux distro tosses in the towel and calls it quits. But whenever a distro goes away, it leaves behind the people who’ve used and worked with it on a daily basis. While there’s no formation of a black hole, there is hole at the center of users’ work schedules and that disruption can do serious damage to those relying upon the distro’s stability. And while getting a new distro installed and running isn’t the nightmare it used to be, it’s still a pain. Read more

Rygel Open-Source Media Server Gets Hack to Support AVI Playback on Philips TVs

The open-source Rygel DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) media server software has been updated earlier, May 23, 2016, to stable version 0.30.3 and development build 0.31.1. Read more

GNOME News

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2016
    This year summit held at Manav Rachna International University (MRIU), which is located in the Faridabad district Delhi, it’s a quiet, beautiful and very very hot place. It gave me a lot of wonderful memories.
  • Endless and Codethink team up for GNOME on ARM
    A couple of months ago Alberto Ruiz issued a Call to Arms here on planet GNOME. This was met with with an influx of eager contributions including a wide variety of server grade ARM hardware, rack space and sponsorship to help make GNOME on ARM a reality.
  • External Plugins in GNOME Software (5)
    There’s a lot of flexibility in the gnome-software plugin structure; a plugin can add custom applications and handle things like search and icon loading in a totally custom way. Most of the time you don’t care about how search is implemented or how icons are going to be loaded, and you can re-use a lot of the existing code in the appstream plugin. To do this you just save an AppStream-format XML file in either /usr/share/app-info/xmls/, /var/cache/app-info/xmls/ or ~/.local/share/app-info/xmls/. GNOME Software will immediately notice any new files, or changes to existing files as it has set up the various inotify watches.
  • External Plugins in GNOME Software (6)
    This is my last post about the gnome-software plugin structure. If you want more, join the mailing list and ask a question. If you’re not sure how something works then I’ve done a poor job on the docs, and I’m happy to explain as much as required.
  • Week 1 of May-August Outreachy
    The Outreachy internship requires that interns maintain a blog, writing at least every other week. This shouldn't be a problem for the usability project. For the first few weeks, I'll essentially give a research topic for Diana, Ciarrai and Renata to look into and write about on their blogs. I've structured the topics so that we'll build up to building our usability tests.