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Waste plenty of time with Frozen Bubble and gnubik

Filed under
Gaming

Let’s face it, we sit at our computers for hours on end. Be it administrating, working, or just plain killing time. Everyone knows that the interwebs is a sure-fire time killer. But what happens, gasp, when those interwebs are down and you’ve no way to pass time? You shrivel up and die right? No! You waste your time coding, writing, or playing games!

Although Linux is not nearly the Game trove that Windows is, it is not without its share of time takers. It’s been a while since I mentioned a game on Ghacks, so I thought maybe I should bring up the topic again. This time around I will visit two games. One of these games is one of my all time favorite second sucker – Frozen Bubble. The other, gnubik, is sure to frustrate you for hours. Let’s take a look at these two gems.

Frozen Bubble is one of my favorite ways to kill time. It’s a simple arcade game with an obvious taste for Linux. Frozen Bubble features:

One or two player game.
Network game play.
3D graphics.
Catchy soundtrack.
100 levels for single player game.
Level editor.

Rest Here




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