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The Good and Bad of Ubuntu Tweak

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

I’ve long heard good things about Ubuntu Tweak, but never used it myself. With the recent appearance of its 0.5 release, however, I decided to give it a go. Here’s what I thought.

As its name implies, Ubuntu Tweak is a third-party application that tweaks Ubuntu’s default configuration. Its goal is to provide “many useful desktop and system options that the default desktop environment doesn’t provide,” and to make those options easily accessible.

Ubuntu Tweak isn’t available from the official Ubuntu repositories, nor does Canonical explicitly endorse the application. But it’s a quick and easy download from the developers’ site.

Tweak away

After installing Ubuntu Tweak and launching it from the Applications>System Tools menu, I was presented with a relatively straightforward interface. It’s divided into five sections for managing different aspects of the system: Applications, Startup, Desktop, Personal, System.

Rest Here




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