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Review: Mod-Security 2.5 by Magnus Mischel

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Being a SysAdmin (as most of you who read this blog regularly know), I love to look at logs to solve problems. If there is an issue, the first thing I always do is look at the logs to see what went wrong. Even when I am writing programs, I build debugging in from the beginning to make sure I know what’s going on at all times (especially when something goes wrong).

One of my favorite things about mod_security is that (amongst other things), it provides logging where none was provided. In fact, there is a whole chapter dedicated to it (chapter 4 on audit logging). And thus the first chapter I went to (just for fun). So I started flipping back and forth between chapters 2 (writing rules) and 4 (audit logging) to create my ruleset. I quickly realized that it was going to be a pain to do it that way. So I sucked it up and started reading the book. I normally hate doing that because typically technical books read like watching paint dry, but this one read fairly easily. I also happen to really like the type face conventions used by Packt Publishing to make examples separate from text separate from whatever else needs to stand out.

Rest Here

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