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SourceForge blocks Iran, North Korea, Syria, Sudan and Cuba

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In a move that must surely strike at the very core of open source, FOSS, and the heart of GNU crusader Richard Stallman, SourceForge has now blocked all access from by countries on the U.S. 'Foreign Assets Control sanction list'.

That isn't the beginning of the story though: back in 2008 the same countries were allowed to surf SourceForge, but not interact with the source code repositories -- they could download, but couldn't contribute. Now it seems the access block is complete -- if you live in Iran, North Korea, Syria, Sudan or Cuba, you simply can't access SourceForge.

Rest Here

Also: Clarifying SourceForge.net’s denial of site access for certain persons in accordance with US law




Censorship

Source Forge denies access! The USA speaks with 'forked tongue'... condemn censorship in China, Egypt and a few other countries and then require censorship of certain countries because of Political ideology. There is no 'Democracy' in the the United States and any US Citizen who believes there is is naive. Oh, yes, I can look at all the Porn I want and run my mouth about how free I am and of course, call political leaders names but 'Free', not a chance.

This action hurts the people's of these countries and has absolutely no effect on the actions of the the governments involved who will continue to use the USA's 'forked tongue' speeches to demonstrate the United States "Social, Ideological and Political Imperialism". "Do not do as we do but do as we say"...I hated that expression growing up and I still hate the logic behind it!

Tibs in China...FREE as in FREE

Cuba

I didn't notice that they are evil while drinking their cocktails, better visit again to recheck...

Should open-source repositories block nations under U.S. sanctio

blogs.computerworld: Arabcrunch has accused major open-source repository SourceForge from blocking all access to software projects it hosts for anyone in Syria, Sudan, Iran, North Korea and Cuba.

Not surprisingly, this policy comes in for a fair amount of ridicule over there. Filtering out the political rhetoric, and the main point is: Either open source is "open" or it's not.

SourceForge defenders note that the issue is likely not SourceForge's own political leanings but their apparent desire to comply with U.S. export laws.

I've got a call into someone at SourceForge parent GeekNet for clarification. But SourceForge's current terms of service do state: "Users residing in countries on the United States Office of Foreign Assets Control sanction list, including Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan and Syria, may not post Content to, or access Content available through, SourceForge.net."

I don't know whether that's new, it's always been there but enforcement was stepped up, or in fact there hasn't been any serious enforcement despite claims otherwise.

Rest here

re: Country Blocks

Since we're talking about Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Sudan who cares (except for the politics - it's hard to understand Cuba being grouped with the rest of the bunch).

None of those Countries are bastions of human, civil, or worldwide rights. None would have a problem with one of their citizens shooting a American in the head (or lopping it off, or holding them hostage, or hijacking their transportation, putting them in prison, etc).

Per the Open Source Freak norm, people get their panties in a knot over nothing. I'm betting most of the people who are upset couldn't point to those Countries on a map (assuming a "no googling" rule was in place).

Wake up

vonskippy wrote:
I'm betting most of the people who are upset couldn't point to those Countries on a map (assuming a "no googling" rule was in place).

Ha ha... most of the people in this planet are not Americans...

Besides, the elites behind this stuff are not just going against the people of those countries, but against western countries very own people. Just see how Christian sites are being censored in Australia, in their new state-imposed internet filter.

First they came for the Muslims, and I din't care because I'm not a Muslim... etc... you know how that ends up don't you.

US screws up, rest of the world suffers

Aren't affected companies pissed off themselves having to comply with draconic US-based regulations, and also the moralic burden of having to impose them onto an *international* clientele? Fortunately, they are free to relocate their registered seats to a less paranoid country.

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