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How much is that software in the Windows?

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Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Or the Mac?

Recently I’ve been trading geekery with a gent in Pennsylvania who is in the process of moving a personal website from remote hosting to self-hosting. He’s a Mac guy and he bought a copy of OS X Server to run on his Mac Mini.

I was curious about this server software, so I looked into it. Seems like a nicely packaged product, typical Mac ease of use and polished user interface. The web server part of it runs on a modified version of Apache. List price is $499 and the best street price I could find after a brief search was $349.99.

Three hundred fifty bucks. Three. Hundred. Fifty. Dollars.

And that’s the discount price. I’m sure there are lots of people paying five benjamins to buy it directly from Apple.

My reaction to this reminds me of when Windows Vista was first released, and to buy the full (i.e. non-upgrade) system at retail cost up to $400 – and the way Microsoft controls their prices, discounters were practically nonexistent.

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Windows partisans get touchy

dwasifar.com: Two days ago I posted a fairly innocuous bit of self-analysis, looking at the change in my own attitudes about the cost of software over the last few years of being a Linux user. It’s critical of the Windows ecosystem, and to a lesser extent the Mac ecosystem, but it’s pretty mild criticism as I go. I’ve written far harsher posts on that subject. But for some reason this one is attracting some fairly vitriolic Windows defenders in the comments section.

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