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An Evening with Jeff Waugh

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Linux

Jeff Waugh is an employee of Canonical Limited, the firm behind Ubuntu Linux. In his spare time he works on the GNOME window manager program. Jeff formerly was the release manager for GNOME.

On November 7, 2005, Jeff Waugh was far away from his native and current home in Australia. He was at the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada, as part of his BadgerBadgerBadger tour. Jeff offered his insights into GNOME and Ubuntu in a talk titled "Running with Scissors". His talk was made possible by the organizing efforts of the University of Toronto graduate student Behdad Esfahbod.

Before the talk started, some free stuff was offered to everyone, including Ubuntu CDs, Ubuntu flyers, Ubuntu stickers, a "Why Gnome" flyer and a flyer promoting PyCon, a Python programming language conference.

At the start of the talk, Jeff noted that the name for the tour came from the name for the third release of Ubuntu--Badger. He also noted that the talk would have some problems because his laptop PC had gone missing two days previously, and he had lost some of the more recent changes. The laptop that he did use for the talk had the only real virtue of being the cheapest laptop in the store.

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