Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Managing Bibliographies with OpenOffice.org and Zotero

Filed under
OOo

If OpenOffice.org’s own bibliography feature doesn’t really cut it for you, you have several choices. One popular bibliography solution is Bibus, a cross-platform tool that integrates nicely with OpenOffice.org. It is, however, not the only bibliographical tool out there. In fact, there is another nifty tool called Zotero that turns Firefox into a powerful research tool. More importantly, it comes with an OpenOffice.org extension that allows you to use Zotero as a bibliography database. Zotero also sports a few clever features that make the process of creating and managing bibliographies much more efficient.

While you can populate your library with bibliographic entries manually, Zotero can do the donkey work for you. It comes with a set of translators that can sense and extract book data from the Web page you’re currently viewing. The list of supported Web sites is impressive, and using Zotero to extract book data from them is straightforward. To see how this works in practice, install Zotero, point your browser to Google Books, and do a search for openoffice. If you take a closer look at Firefox’s address bar, you’ll notice a folder icon — that indicates that Zotero has discovered several book entries on the page.

Rest Here




More in Tux Machines

Games: Singularity: Escalation, ASTROKILL and More

Red Hat News

Android Leftovers

PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more