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10 Characteristics of a Linux Guru?

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Linux

I just read a post on another site from someone who calls himself (herself?), linux guru, and it made me ponder the following question: What is a Linux Guru? I've known many knowledgeable people over the years but never have I met an actual guru. I wonder if people like linux guru think that he can call himself "linux guru" because he believes that everyone else is a Linux Newbie? Or, perhaps linux guru is the world's only true Linux Guru and he wants his due fame. To help answer the question, I've compiled a list of ten characteristics that I think define what a Linux Guru is.

I've worked with Linux since 1995 and still wouldn't call myself a guru. It seems that there's always someone out there who's found some obscure thingy to tell me about--making me feel as if I don't scour the Internet's neutral zone enough for these things.

What are the ten characteristics of a Linux Guru?




re: Linux Guru

I laughed out loud until I figured out the guy was serious.

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