Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Say Happy New Year to srlinuxx!

Filed under
Just talk

Dear friends,

Tuxmachines is our site for news and we love it! Just think about the great performance, stability, pleasure, and swift news postings you have got used to reading. srlinuxx is working relentlessly, day and night, to provide us the latest and finest news articles. And all this for free! But she, as anyone of us, has bills to pay and needs to eat and drink something to keep up this fantastic work, right? Don't you want to express your gratitude for your everyday trusted news site? Wouldn't it be great to make this year a very special one for srlinuxx? Yes? Now is your chance to finally get rid of your qualms and do something you wanted to do for a long time: Go and say Thank you and Happy New Year to srlinux for all her time, effort, and hard work so she can continue providing you the best news site out there!

Best wishes and happy holidays!

Click here to Say Thank You!

P.S. Happy Birthday srlinuxx.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

thank you

Thank you for your post and your birthday wishes.

How did you know it was my birthday? Damn google! damn them to heelll! Big Grin

Happy birthday

Happy birthday, Susan, and thanks so much for the hard work!

Happy New Year, srlinuxx

Thanks for the hard work.

Happy birthday and New Year...

...and thanks for tuxmachines Smile

re: facebook

Quote:

Is that you on Myspace.com/susanlinton cape cod?

no, that's not me.

It's a wannabe!

It's a wannabe! Big Grin

Happy New Year!

Here's hoping that all your links are good ones. Your site is one I come to every day.

Maybe vonskippy will contribute a negative amount.

re: dumbass

djohnston wrote:
Maybe vonskippy will contribute a negative amount.

Good Job Dumbass, I'm sure srlinuxx appreciates you pissing off future donations.

re: dumbass

I was trying to figure out what exactly he meant. I figured it had some connection to your comments which some may characterize as "negative."

Vonskippy has done a lot for tuxmachines. Many of you know that he provided the server (with a spare mobo) that our site runs on, but he also sent me a new monitor and harddrive for my desktop a few months ago when mine went out. So, Vonskippy has been a good friend to us.

I'll take this opportunity to thank those that did send in a donation in response to Poodle's request. They are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

re:dumbass

vonskippy wrote:
djohnston wrote:
Maybe vonskippy will contribute a negative amount.

Good Job Dumbass, I'm sure srlinuxx appreciates you pissing off future donations.

Someone's a little touchy. Looks like I hit a nerve.

Happy Belated Birthday

Happy Belated Birthday, Susan! I know a couple people born on the 31st, I've always considered them special/lucky for it. Let's hope that always holds true for you!

wow

I know I don't agree with Von Skippy on everything. Where's the fun in that?

I have seen him post interesting opinions and include information to back up his opinions.

That in itself is a meaningful contribution to any forum or interactive site.

Personally, I don't think it would "feel' like TuxMachines without him.

Just my two cent.

Big Bear

re: wow

Then there's the priceless gift of laugher that he (Vonskippy) and Poodles (and sometimes others) have provided.

Sometimes those little jewels of silliness (and/or sarcasm) come at the most opportune times for me.

Quote:

Personally, I don't think it would "feel' like TuxMachines without him.

You got that right!

Thanks to everyone who donated a little something

Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who stuck a few dollars in srlinuxx's g-string this year and to those who have contributed hardware to keep this wonderful news site up and running.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Install and Configure Hadoop on Ubuntu 20.04 – TecAdmin

    Hadoop is a free, open-source and Java-based software framework used for storage and processing of large datasets on clusters of machines. It uses HDFS to store its data and process these data using MapReduce. It is an ecosystem of Big Data tools that are primarily used for data mining and machine learning. Apache Hadoop 3.3 come with noticeable improvements any many bug fixes over the previous releases. It has four major components such as Hadoop Common, HDFS, YARN, and MapReduce.

  • How to create a Cloudwatch Event Rule in AWS

    A near-real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources is delivered by CloudWatch Events. We can create a rule that matches events and route them to one or more target functions. We can use CloudWatch Events to schedule automated actions. These actions can be self-triggered at certain times using cron or rate expressions. We can have EC2 instances, Lambda functions, Kinesis Data Streams, ECS tasks, Batch jobs, SNS topics, SQS queues, and a few more services as target endpoints for CloudWatch Events. To know more about Cloudwatch events, visit the official AWS documentation here.

  • How to use Bash file test operators in Linux

    File Test Operators are used in Linux to check and verify attributes of files like ownership or if they are a symlink. Every Test operator has a specific purpose. The most important operators are -e and -s. In this article, you will learn to test files using the if statement followed by some important test operators in Linux.

  • How To Install Wireguard on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of the Wireguard VPN on CentOS 8.

  • How To Install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7 – TecAdmin

    NVM stands for Node Version Manager is a command-line utility for managing Node versions. Sometimes you required to deploy multiple node application with different-2 versions. Managing the multiple Node.js versions for differnt-2 projects are a pain for the developers. But NVM helped to easily manage multiple active Node.js versions on a single system. This tutorial will explain you to install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7/6 systems and manage multiple Node.js versions.

  • How to install Kali Linux 2020.4 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Kali Linux 2020.4.

  • How to make your own personal VPN in under 30 minutes

    In the Distribution box, choose the newest available Ubuntu LTS release — as of the time of writing, that's 20.04 LTS. Below that, pick the region you want your VPN to be located in. It's possible to change the location later, but you'll have to contact Linode support. For the plan, select 'Nanode 1GB' from the list of Shared CPU options. VPNs don't need much processing power, so this low-spec option will work just fine.

  • Use nnn as a File Manager for Linux Terminal - Make Tech Easier

    If you have used the Linux terminal for an extended period of time, you probably know some of the useful commands, like cd to move into and out of folders, create new ones, and copy or move files. Still, you may prefer how desktop file managers are more user-friendly and quicker for some tasks. In that case, you’ll love nnn. nnn is the equivalent of a desktop file manager for the terminal. Although not an ultra-complex solution like Midnight Commander, nnn is light on resources, fast, and allows you to navigate your file system without having to type commands.

Android Leftovers

What Does the Penguin Say?

I chalk this up to a few factors. First, Linux was practically born on the Web. In Linux’s infancy, Linus Torvalds not only made the kernel available online, but he attracted a throng of would-be contributors via Usenet who collaborated in Linux’s development. The Internet has been a significant distribution channel ever since, facilitating the obtainment and installation of desktop Linux distributions in the large majority of cases today. Second, since one could not easily purchase a computer with Linux preinstalled until around the last decade, online communities were essential for fielding the questions of Linux initiates. It is comforting to know there are veterans who can help when setting up an entirely new OS, especially one so off the beaten path. This has traditionally been, and remains, Linux’s main analog to customer support that competing OSes offer. Finally, and perhaps most significantly, Linux simply offers so many choices. Windows gives you Windows the Windows way. On Mac, you get Mac the way Mac was intended. Not so with desktop Linux. Why? Simply put, there is no one “desktop Linux.” With Linux, every distribution gives you a completely different suite of user programs built atop the kernel, sometimes with its own repackaging of the kernel itself. Not least of the cornucopia of options that the desktop Linux world offers is that of desktop environments. Most distros present a handful of curated desktop environments. Between all the Linux distros out there, one will encounter literally dozens of them. The only hope a humble Linux user has of figuring out which one they might want, aside from taking them all for a spin, is to ask around. Users also really get into advocating for particular desktops. This is nearly always good-natured, leading to amusing, if not informative, discussion threads. Read more

Vulkan Ray Tracing

  • NVIDIA Releases Beta Driver With Khronos Vulkan Ray Tracing Support

    While NVIDIA has supported its own vendor-specific Vulkan ray-tracing extension on Windows and Linux since the GeForce RTX GPUs originally debuted, they are moving quick to support the Khronos ray-tracing extensions for Vulkan given the industry adoption and games coming to market likely opting for using the KHR version. This morning with Vulkan 1.2.162 the Vulkan KHR ray-tracing extensions were made official after being out in provisional form since earlier this year. NVIDIA has now released beta drivers for Windows and Linux that support these finalized versions.

  • Vulkan Ray Tracing becomes official with Vulkan 1.2.162 (updated) | GamingOnLinux

    The day has arrived, along with the release of Vulkan 1.2.162 being tagged in the Vulkan-Docs repository on GitHub the Vulkan Ray Tracing extensions are now officially released. From being announced as a provisional set in March 2020, The Khronos Group formally announced it's done. "Welcome to the era of portable, cross-vendor, cross-platform ray tracing acceleration!" - Daniel Koch, NVIDIA

  • Vulkan 1.2.162 Released With Ray-Tracing Support Promoted - Phoronix

    Earlier this year Vulkan ray-tracing arrived in provisional form while with today's Vulkan 1.2.162 specification update this functionality has been promoted to stable and ready for broad industry support. The Vulkan ray-tracing support is now deemed final and out of the provisional guard. This includes the finalized versions of VK_KHR_acceleration_structure, VK_KHR_ray_tracing_pipeline, VK_KHR_ray_query, VK_KHR_pipeline_library, and VK_KHR_deferred_host_operations.