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Will Linux Survive the Global Economic Meltdown?

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Linux

While companies worldwide look for ways to reduce costs, shed dead weight from their labor resources and streamline their businesses, it makes me wonder if Linux will survive the global economic meltdown.

The answer isn't easy.

The reason is that Microsoft isn't making it easy.

Linux for server systems, enterprise or small business, is a fine choice. It's a toss-up for most businesses if they have all the facts in front of them with which to make that choice. Often they don't. Microsoft has a marketing machine like no other. You hear Microsoft and you assume quality, reliability and a top-rated global company.

Linux, alternatively, conjures up strange people who sport sandals, wear ponytails, don red fedoras, quote lines from Monty Python episodes and flash the intergalactic 'gang' sign (The Vulcan 'live long and prosper thing').
It also makes business owners think that it's wholly unreliable.

rest here




wow, to be so wrong and still not know it

"its only sweat equity of hobbyists."

Just because Linux on the desktop hasn't made it, doesn't mean Linux as as OS hasn't accomplished anything or that it is irrelevant otherwise.

As the many posts of companies like RedHat and others increasing both in customers and profits indicates, Linux is indeed more than a product of the 'sweat equity of hobbyists."

IBM has made quite a bit of progress pushing Linux on the mainframes they have seen increased sales of. Dell has continued to increase the exposure of of their Linux based offerings.

No, you are, as usual, delusional and way off the mark.

Big Bear

You still don't get it

You keep wanting to compare Linux development to every other technology growth under the sun.

Linux growth can't be compared that easily unless you really don't want to be accurate.

As usual, you don't.

Us bears might be dumb, but at least we know how to use punctuation.

Big Bear

Why use punctuation?

So that people can communicate, which obviously, you don't.

And you should know IBM installs and supports Linux on several products, including the mainframes I mentioned earlier.

So, enjoy your delusion.

Big Bear

Some current examples:

"Red Hat's revenue in the third quarter ended Nov. 30 was $194.3 million, up 18% from the same quarter a year ago. Subscription revenue, often acquired by customers in three-year increments and an indicator of future financial health, was up 21% at 164.4 million.

In a severe recession, Red Hat is one of a handful of software success stories in the technology industry. Oracle is another; its revenue was up 4% in its recently closed second quarter of 2010. "

"Union Pacific executives wanted the ability to commingle vehicles from different manufacturers on a single railcar, says Malley. The old system wouldn't have been able to handle that change, he says. But thanks to a new distributed network that has been in development since 2006, the company has been able to introduce some of that functionality and much more.

The emerging network, dubbed NetControl, is based on a service-oriented architecture platform that relies heavily on open-source technologies such as the Apache Web server, Hibernate query software and SpringSource's Java application management tools. It is being written in J2EE and runs on Linux."

"By operating system platform, Windows accounted for just under $1.3bn in sales, dropping 22.7 per cent compared to Q3 2008, and Unix servers accounted for $770.3m, down 36.3 per cent. Linux sales were comparatively bright, falling only 18 per cent, to $502.6m. Other platforms had a 19.6 per cent drop to $404.5m in sales in the quarter."

The above are just a few examples of Linux capacity to grow and succeed where others have more difficulty.

Do your homework before you inflict your poor language skills on us.

Big Bear

Melting Down the “Linux” Global Will

doctormo.wordpress: Ken Hess of Daniweb posting an amusing article about marketing, his personal feelings of frustration at the inability of a group of random plebs to marshal enough resources for a prime time advertising budget.

Ken, you are a card. I know you want to make your entries interesting, but look at this:

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