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Linux 2019

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Linux

No matter how often I see it, I still can't get used to people typing into tables. Bad enough that people are always mumbling to themselves -- cut cells C3-C7, paste to D3-D7 -- but the constant drumming of fingers is just annoying. And please, don't get me started on people wearing iContact lens! At least when you saw someone with smartglasses on you knew they might, or might, not be actually looking at you. With the new smartlens, you can't tell if someone's staring at you in a stoned haze, taking your photo, working on something entirely remote from the location, or -- could it be!? -- actually looking at you.

In 2019, we'll be in the post-operating system world. Linux will still be around, and so will Windows and the Mac OS, but just like today, most of them will be using Linux every day. Also just like today, when people use services like Google, Facebook and Twitter, they won't realize that they're using Linux. In the future, engineers and programmers will still be familiar with operating systems, users won't have any more awareness of Mac OS or Windows than they do today with Linux.

That's because, while Microsoft may be offering Windows 10, most people's concept of computing will have left the desktop behind. Instead of thinking about whether Ubuntu 10.10 is better than WinTen, they'll simply be using what Glenn Britt, Time Warner Cable's CEO, calls the world of the four "Anys" -- any content, any device, anytime and anyplace.

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