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Joe-Danger – Stunts Racing Game

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Gaming

Ever wanted to play a stuntman, building dangerous tracks and taking your motorcycle for a spin ? If the answer is positive then Joe-Danger the upcoming game from the indie developers Hello Games might be for you.

The purpose of this game is to have fun, with it’s childish graphics it doesn’t attempt to be a realistic simulator.

Joe Danger is a racing, track-building, combo making, stunts game that will be released very soon and it will also be available for GNU/Linux as the build was already done.

You are Joe Danger, the world’s most determined stuntman. You live to thrill the crowd and break World Records. Take on your friends or race against your rivals – the reckless “Team Nasty”. You laugh in the face of danger, and it laughs back, as you bounce from boulder to boulder, on fire, towards that pile of mousetraps. Freeze the game at any point and edit your level however you want it. Once you are finished, share the joy.

Joe Danger aims to recreate the childish joy of the first time you took a toy motorbike, doused it in lighter fluid, lit it, and launched it at high speed over your carefully constructed ramp out a second story window, while all the kids in the neighbourhood cheered below.

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