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Ubuntu 10.04 LTS: How we get there

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Ubuntu

The development of Ubuntu 10.04 has been underway for nearly two months now, and will produce our third long-term (LTS) release in April. What I want to talk about, though, is not the individual projects we’re working on. I want to explain how the whole thing comes together, and what’s happening behind the scenes to make 10.04 LTS different from other Ubuntu releases.

Changing the focus

Robbie Williamson, engineering manager for the foundations team, has captured the big picture in the LTS release plan, the key elements of which are:

Merge from Debian testing

By merging from Debian testing, rather than the usual unstable, we aim to avoid regressions early in the release cycle which tend to block development work. So far, Lucid has been surprisingly usable in its first weeks, compared to previous Ubuntu releases.

Add fewer features

By starting fewer development projects, and opting for more testing projects over feature projects, we will free more time and energy for stabilization. This approach will help us to discover regressions earlier, and to fix them earlier as well. This doesn’t mean that Ubuntu 10.04 won’t have bugs (with hundreds of millions of lines of source code, there is no such thing as a bug-free system), but we believe it will help us to produce a system which is suitable for longer-term use by more risk-averse users.

Avoid major infrastructure changes




Excellent Read

Taking Ubuntu from Testing is a good idea for the LTS release and I think that this might just be the best LTS release so far.

Unoobtu

Anonymo wrote:
this might just be the best LTS release so far.

And that sets the bar where? Slightly above lame?

//gosh, I'm just so excited my hallux's are quivering//

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