Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS: How we get there

Filed under
Ubuntu

The development of Ubuntu 10.04 has been underway for nearly two months now, and will produce our third long-term (LTS) release in April. What I want to talk about, though, is not the individual projects we’re working on. I want to explain how the whole thing comes together, and what’s happening behind the scenes to make 10.04 LTS different from other Ubuntu releases.

Changing the focus

Robbie Williamson, engineering manager for the foundations team, has captured the big picture in the LTS release plan, the key elements of which are:

Merge from Debian testing

By merging from Debian testing, rather than the usual unstable, we aim to avoid regressions early in the release cycle which tend to block development work. So far, Lucid has been surprisingly usable in its first weeks, compared to previous Ubuntu releases.

Add fewer features

By starting fewer development projects, and opting for more testing projects over feature projects, we will free more time and energy for stabilization. This approach will help us to discover regressions earlier, and to fix them earlier as well. This doesn’t mean that Ubuntu 10.04 won’t have bugs (with hundreds of millions of lines of source code, there is no such thing as a bug-free system), but we believe it will help us to produce a system which is suitable for longer-term use by more risk-averse users.

Avoid major infrastructure changes




Excellent Read

Taking Ubuntu from Testing is a good idea for the LTS release and I think that this might just be the best LTS release so far.

Unoobtu

Anonymo wrote:
this might just be the best LTS release so far.

And that sets the bar where? Slightly above lame?

//gosh, I'm just so excited my hallux's are quivering//

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

What is Ubuntu?

The open source community is packed full of intriguing projects and companies, so much so that even the biggest of proprietary vendors have moved to embrace it. Ubuntu is one of those open source projects that has developed a wide-spread following. Ubuntu is an open source Linux distribution based on Debian, which is a freely available operating system that uses the Linux kernel. Initially developed for personal computers, it has developed to being used on servers, and smartphones. Development of Ubuntu is led by Canonical, a UK based company that was founded by Mark Shuttleworth. Read more

Hands-on with Ubuntu MATE 16.04 on the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3

To put things into a fair perspective, keep in mind that we are talking about a computer that costs $25 or so and can be used with a display, keyboard and mouse which a lot of people are going to have on hand already. That means for a very small amount of money, you can have a very nice computer running one of the most popular Linux distributions. Some people (including me) might argue that there are really not many (or any) significant advantages of Ubuntu MATE over Raspbian, but even I can't deny that MATE looks more polished, and if you are accustomed to Ubuntu in general or MATE in particular, then this distribution is the way to go. Read more

Solus Project Announces New Tool for Enabling Better Steam Integration on Linux

Ikey Doherty and the Solus Project are proud to announce today the availability of a new project that aims to better integrate the Steam client on various GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more

GNOME 3.21.2 Released

Hi! The second snapshot of the GNOME 3.21 cycle is now available!! To compile GNOME 3.21.2, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2] (which use the exact tarball versions from the official release). [1] https://developer.gnome.org/jhbuild/ [2] https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.21.2/ The release notes that describe the changes between 3.21.1 and 3.21.2 are available. Go read them to learn what's new in this release: core - https://download.gnome.org/core/3.21/3.21.2/NEWS apps - https://download.gnome.org/apps/3.21/3.21.2/NEWS Read more Also: GNOME 3.21.2 Released With More Wayland Improvements, Flatpak