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Why Use GNote When There’s Tomboy?

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Software

GNote is interesting is an interesting application because it is a sticky notes application which allows wiki-like syntax, linking, and so on. And it looks very much like Tomboy, as it’s a re-write of that application. I installed GNote from the PPA. And when it was finally installed, guess what. I launched it and was surprised to see something very similar. Except that, of course, under the Tools menu, there’s no such thing as “post to your blog” as an option.

What is to love about it?

* For one thing it loads so much faster than Tomboy.
* Another thing is that it seems to use only half the memory that Tomboy uses.
* It recognized all my Tomboy notes and so I didn’t really have to do anything to make sure it does that. Very convenient.

For me these three reasons are awesome enough. Big Grin




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