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Exploring New Nepomuk Features in Mandriva

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You have probably heard of Nepomuk, the semantic desktop technology we've been shipping for a while as part of the KDE Platform. However, so far, you may not have noticed it really doing very much useful for you. So what is this thing called Nepomuk, what can it do for us now and what will it bring us in the future? We asked two of the driving forces behind Nepomuk, Stéphane Laurière and Sebastian Trüg of Mandriva, to tell us about the real Nepomuk features that are already available in KDE software and those that have been introduced with Mandriva Linux 2010.

An overview of the current status

So, where are we at with Nepomuk now, compared to where we want to be? Stéphane explains that "Nepomuk initially aimed at two main achievements: 1) the ability to interlink data semantically on the desktop across the applications, 2) the ability to share semantic information with other desktops". The first is "getting mature from the infrastructure point of view" and he believes that Mandriva Linux 2010 gives a good insight into the improvements it can bring to the user, but much remains to be done. The design of the framework for the second main objective started only recently: "a workshop took place in Freiburg early November and resulted in a first draft of the Nepomuk Sharing Ontology, and in a set of sharing use cases". Ultimately, it should be possible to share semantic information everywhere from mobile handsets to enterprise servers so that "the sky's the limit".

Nepomuk is already there in ways that you hardly notice - when you tag an image in Dolphin that tag is also visible in Gwenview. Obvious right? Well of course, but that is Nepomuk in action behind the scenes.

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