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I've got more Linux users than you.

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Linux

First Mandriva claims on their website that over 3 million people use their distribution. So Ubuntu comes out saying oh yeh, well we have over 8 million users neener neener boo boo. Finally Red Hat says that's nothing Ubuntu! Fedora has 20 million installations!

So I asked where did you get these numbers and what facts do you have to back them up? Come to find out they are just estimates someone thought up! What a crock of poo.

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in terms of numbers

Those that sell support based on installed hosts, as RedHat and I think Canonical does as well, not sure about Mandriva, will have records available to show how many installed machines they are supporting.

RedHat will likely have the best documentation because they require one to sign up to get the software.

Big Bear

Numbers

poodles wrote:

So I asked where did you get these numbers and what facts do you have to back them up? Come to find out they are just estimates someone thought up! What a crock of poo.

The amount of unique IP addresses downloading a given update? It's been explained by all of the companies mentioned in the article.

Shure different IP addresses can belong to the same machine because of DHCP, but what is the likelyhood for that machine to download the same updates multiple times? The same that a server downloads them once and distributes them to multiple machines; the two things sort of make up for each other.

100 million users

Now Ubuntu claiming over 100 million users! hahahaha

distro hoppers

It would be hard to say distinguish a distro hopper and a "every day user", unless your using red hat or possibly solaris with the paid support. You cant guess a user number by how many people downloaded a distro, i download distros all the time to try them in my vm but i am not a daily user, many times i think they are cool but lack a lot of stuff. A distro could have an app where you register your distro to officially make it yours, where it registeres you to the distro forums for support and fills in any data you send it, then in like a month you can validate the registration or revalidate your exististence to the distros web server, but thats annoying. Thats almost like malware.

Re: distro hoppers

sunshine_killer wrote:
You cant guess a user number by how many people downloaded a distro,

That's why they use update downloads and not distro downloads. Check out:

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Statistics#Yum_Data

Steve Ballmer says Linux has a larger user base than Apple:

http://www.osnews.com/story/21035/Ballmer_Linux_Bigger_Competitor_than_Apple.

Maybe he can tell us how he counted Linux users, Apple sold 9-10 million PCs in 2008.

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