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Best 4 Antivirus Software for Your Ubuntu OS

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Software

As we already know, Linux is immune to viruses and other nasty malware. However, there are still a lot of other reasons to install an antivirus program on your Linux computer. These days there are many antivirus software providers in the market, which offers the user better pricing and also better protection.

Avest! Linux Home Edition

avast! is offered as a free download for the Linux platform for personal and non-commercial use. The antivirus kernel is exactly the same as the antivirus kernel for avast! for theWindows platform , so the users will receive the same updates. The update frequency is twice or thrice per week regularly but it becomes more frequent during the malware breakout times. The user interface is very intuitive so I’d not expect a steep learning curve with the program. You can scan all of your drives, selected files/folders, quarantine items, store them in virus chest and send them to avast! labs for further analysis. There is also a command-line utility for experienced users.

avast! can scan almost all compressed archives except MAPI, CAB, ACE, CHM, 7ZIP and NTFS-streams. Additionally, it can also scan executable package formats. Since the Linux version of the program shares the same antivirus kernel with the Windows version, it is not likely that you will have any problems with the other file formats, such as Microsoft Office, PDF etc..

AVG

Rest Here




Where's defrag

Can't wait to get defrag for Ubuntu too! Big Grin

Well...

Anti-virus for Linux is more for scanning your system for Windows viruses and such so that you don't pass them along to an unsuspecting Windows user. So far, there are not Linux viruses to scan for.

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