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Build the Perfect Desktop With KDE

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KDE

As much I would like to believe I am as brilliant and charismatic as Linus Torvalds, it's really not worth the effort, because it's so not true. But Linus and I do agree on one thing: KDE is an excellent desktop. It looks good and it works well- what more does anyone need? Best of all, it doesn't simplify by removing functionality, like a certain well-known desktop project does. You want a simpler, cleaner interface? Might I suggest organizing the menus and configuration dialogs with common functions on top, and advanced functions available on a different level? Throwing away functionality seems a tad daft.

KDE is extremely customizable, which is a boon to Linux distribution packagers, corporate and other business users, and finicky end users who want everything just so. It can even be locked down into a particular customized configuration, which is useful in public environments like Internet cafes and public libraries, and on tyrannical corporate desktops.

Today we'll look at what sort of applications are available for KDE, where to find them, and some ideas for building your own super-powered Kryptonite-proof workstation, customized to your exacting personal specs.

Full Story.

missing link

The link to the story seems to be missing. Here is the link:
http://www.enterprisenetworkingplanet.com/netos/article.php/3572396

re: link

geezus, biggest story of the day and I mess up the link. It was actually there, just left out one little quote causing it not to show up. dang... sorry and thanks.

and 400 folks clicking on it and no one said a word until you just now. tsck tsck...

thanks so much.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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