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The Incredible Guide to NEW Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

There are a lot of people still stuck with Windows because it’s the ‘easier alternative’. Linux is both cheaper and more versatile than Microsoft’s operating system, but the learning curve has frightened off many people.

In the past we published A Newbie’s Getting Started Guide to Linux, aimed at the making you familiar with the most basic Linux principles.

With the release of a new Ubuntu (Linux for human beings) distribution, Karmic Koala, we felt it was time to go back to the roots and beyond.

We teamed up with Guvnr.com to create the Ubuntu Karmic Koala Bible – a guide that’s both great for Linux initiates, and invariably useful for Linux intermediates. With over fifty pages of copy-paste tutorials, this guide belongs in the virtual library of every Linux user!

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This guide is dangerous

Too much stuff that no average user should ever see, plus lots of mistakes ...

swappiness? Why touch that? Depends on many parameters, including filesystem, ram size, swap size, cpu power, task demands, etc. Throwing values about from 60 to 10, dangerous. Why not 1? Why not increase the number of pdflush threads as well? We want faster swapping, right?

If we're going crazy, why not change filesystem affinity, why not change dirty ratio as well? That's for people who really know what they're doing and 99% of all users should never ever ever touch /proc.

Then, there is no need to reboot to get sysctl settings take effect. sysctl -p is enough. And no average user should change that.

Then, there's a link to kernel 2.4 packet filtering ...?

The spectrum the guide covers is too wide and too dangerous.

Koala Bible or Koala Tragedy?

I agree with the earlier comment. I can easily envision a noob playing with disk partitioning and tweaking system files with very tragic results.

Furthermore, I would not consider this 50+ page guide as anything close to being able to claim the title of "Bible". A noob would do much better by going to a bookstore and browsing in the computer OS section. There really are some good Ubuntu texts.

The author should consider breaking up his topics and publishing them as blog posts.

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