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PulseAudio Revisited

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Karmic Koala (Ubuntu 9.10) has come out now, and I’m still getting 70 hits a week on my original article concerning PulseAudio. The situation has changed radically, and so that people will get correct information concerning it, I felt it necessary to revise my previous findings.

PulseAudio can no longer be killed off in favor of Alsa. Karmic Koala has so tied up and dumbed down the situation that killing off PulseAudio will kill off ALL sound. Not only that, but there is no way to cause the system sounds (window open/close, button press, etc) to work right. An additional factor is that you are apt to have a heart attack when changing from one user to another due to the HIGH volume level of the alert sound for the new login screen. The only way I’ve found to fix this is to kill off ALL system sounds.

I will say this in favor of PulseAudio, the sound has improved some. Only some.

I agree

I agree 100% with tycheent. I would add that Ubuntu is not the only guilty party with this issue. I think that Debian has the ideal model for this type of issue - keep software that is not ready in the testing / unstable repos where it belongs. As an end user I don't give a fiddlers high jump what the excuse of the day is for pulse audio. Keep it on your own hard drive and off of mine until it is ready. Pushing alpha level software onto a final release isn't wise. When the alpha level software happens to be something as basic as the sound system, that's just plain dumb.

Its' not that it isn't ready

It's not that PA isn't ready, it's the deliberate choices of its developer, that one may like or not.

re: pulseaudio

At least Mandriva 2010 makes it easy to disable pulseaudio. Simply fire up the Mandriva Control Center (enter root password), select hardware, sound configuration, and uncheck the check box labeled "Enable Pulse Audio".

re: re: pulseaudio

which I did. Big Grin

...but only cuz of Flash sound. The rest seemed to be working, but I hadn't tested extensively at that point.

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