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Ubuntu One Music Store: A Real Business

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Ubuntu

During the Ubuntu 9.10 launch a few weeks ago, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth hinted that Ubuntu may ultimately gain music and entertainment store capabilities — similar to offerings from Apple (iTunes) and Amazon.com. Fast forward to the present, and Canonical appears to be preparing the Ubuntu One Music Store. Here’s why.

On the one hand, WorksWithU focuses mainly on Ubuntu in business. But we certainly won’t ignore the consumer market — especially when Canonical’s consumer efforts could potentially help to fund the rest of the company.

Although details are still sketchy, the Ubuntu One Music Store appears to be part of Ubuntu 10.04 (code-named Lucid Lynx).

According to Launchpad:

“The Lucid music store project aims to deliver the ability to purchase music from within a desktop music player.”

Where will the music come from? A new online music store? Or some existing store? My best guess — and this is purely a guess — is some sort of connection to the Amazon MP3 music store.

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