Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mandriva Linux Community Words: Buchan Milne

Filed under
Interviews
MDV

For this second interview we are going to South Africa to meet Buchan Milne.

When did you start contributing to Mandriva Linux? Why did you choose Mandriva Linux as a distribution and for contribution?.

While at University, the lab I was working in started doing commercial work, and could no longer use the site licenses afforded to the University (for the likes of Netware etc.), just at the time they most needed some real infrastructure. I had used Red Hat (6.0) while updating their website, but had been frustrated with the fact every time you wanted to install some additional software (that was on the CD, but you had neglected to select during installation) you had to manually track down all the RPMS (the –aid option to rpm didn’t even exist then).

I had tried Mandrake Linux 6.0 or 6.1 to try out KDE, and when 7.0 was released, which made it easier to install any additional software (via urpmi), it solved one of my bigger frustrations with Red Hat.

We used 7.0 as a file server, mail server, web server etc., but we were growing...

Rest Here




Buchan Milne

He is a pompous ass on the Cooker mailing list. His opinion is more important than others.

Buchan Milne

Good reason to not use Mandriva. Who the heck kicks the creator out of their own company?

Ma Ma Mandriva

Ma Ma Mandriva!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more