Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hitch your wagon to a lizard: dist-upgrading openSUSE

Filed under
Linux

For the first time, openSUSE now officially supports a "dist-upgrade" feature, similar to Debian's. Which is to say, if you've got openSUSE 11.1 installed, you should be able to upgrade to openSUSE 11.2 by updating your list of software repositories to point to providers of software for openSUSE 11.2, doing a distribution upgrade via the Internet, and have a reasonable chance of success.

The stated reasoning behind the addition of this feature seems to focus on competition with Ubuntu. Fine then; although the openSUSE installation media's offered the option of updating rather than installing for a while now, it was always a hit and miss affair; usually more miss than hit, so that doing a clean install was often necessary. (One obvious reason is that the installation media only provides a few software repositories; if you had a whole bunch of online repositories active prior to installation, you probably had software installed that wasn't even on the installation media. Novell also seems to be admitting that its software management tools weren't up to the task until now.)

The easiest way to upgrade from openSUSE 11.1 to 11.2 is via the command line. However, that doesn't make for very exciting screenshots, so I elected to install a YaST module named "wagon" that does the same thing. It failed about halfway through the process, and I had to go back to the command line. If you use "wagon," I hope your results are better than mine! Here's the play-by-play.

(Two things of note: They say that the more repositories you have enabled, the greater the chance that a distribution upgrade won't work. And my screenshots of KDE and GNOME won't look like what you see if you install openSUSE out-of-the-box, since I've re-decorated.)


Step 1: Install "wagon" via YaST.


Step 2: Disable and/or update existing software repositories to their openSUSE 11.2 equivalents.

(This was tedious but mostly meant changing a "1" to a "2" in the repo's URL.)

Existing repository New repository
Gnome:Backports:2.6 (openSUSE v11.1) No v11.2 equivalent. Disable.
Gnome:Stable:2.6 (openSUSE v11.1) Gnome:Stable:2.8 (openSUSE v11.2)
server:monitoring - v11.1 v11.2
Packman - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - Mozilla - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - Virtualization (VirtualBox) - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - KDE:Community - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - KDE:Backports - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - GNOME:STABLE (v11.1) No 11.2 equivalent. Disable.
openSUSE BuildService - GNOME:Community - v11.1 v11.2
NVIDIA repository - v11.1 v11.2
Main Repository (OSS) - v11.1 v11.2
Main Repository (NON-OSS) - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE BuildService - KDE:Core Packages - v11.1 v11.2
openSUSE-11.1-Updates v11.2
home:ecanuto (Gnome colors icons) - v11.1 Factory
home:cyberorg:experimental (Fusion icon) (v11.1) No v11.2 equivalent. Disable.
Qt 4.5 - v11.1 v11.2
Qt 4.4 - v11.1 v11.2
KDE 4 Playground - 11.1 v11.2
KDE 4 Community - 11.1 v11.2
KDE 4 Core Packages - 11.1 v11.2


Step 3: Run "wagon." (Alt+F2 brings up the "run" dialog box in KDE. Command: "kdesu -c yast2 wagon")


Step 4: Follow the prompts.


Fixing dependency errors.


Updating zypper and friends.

Step 5: At this point, the problems started: windows with nothing in them. After several full-sized blank windows came up, another one came up that I couldn't close. I finally used xkill on "wagon".


Step 6: At this point I gave up on "wagon," started up a Konsole session, and used the "zypper dup" command. After answering a few dependency solver questions and accepting the openSUSE license, it was a matter of sitting back and waiting...


Step 7: I'm not sure how long the upgrade took (had to catch some zzzZZZ's) but it was over 3 hours. The only steps left to do were to run the "SuSEconfig" command and reboot.


KDE 4.3.1


GNOME 2.28


KDE 3.5.10

The only thing I had to do afterwards was to use YaST's "/etc/sysconfig Editor" to change the session manager from "kdm" to "kdm4". Apparently openSUSE 11.1 used a KDE 3-based login manager, and so I got an ugly login screen upon reboot. The only thing that's broken is PulseAudio, GNOME's sound server, which is now often belching static when changing the volume level or playing system sounds. Otherwise, everything seems to work OK. Good job, Novell.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Umm

They actually refer to "Debian/Ubuntu" in terms of compatibility. No just Ubuntu.

Also, the feature of being able to do said upgrade is a feature made prominent and possible by APT. Which is the mainstay package management core tool in Debian, and consequently Ubuntu.

Because Opensuse uses zypper and not APT was one of the main reasons they could not offer said compatibility.

other rpm based distros do offer an online update/upgrade capability, such as PCLOS, because they use a tool like (in PCLOS's case, APT4rpm).

Up until recently, zypper did not have this functionality built into it.

Big Bear

Interesting

OpenSUSE is trying to copy Ubuntu. Apt is like Zypper in a sense, that it manages packages and that is the type of functionality that OpenSUSE wishes they could have. That is why Slackware is built in with prominent reasons of use, like PCLOS did first. I hope that OpenSUSE can catch up to Debian in this sense.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers