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Apache 2.2.0: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

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Software

Apache 2.2.0 is major release of the Apache httpd server and includes a number of critical changes. Many of these changes are improvements of existing modules, but there are also a number of new modules and improvements in some aspects of the operational functionality. This article will cover some of the specific elements that have changed (with examples and alternative configurations) as well as discuss when to upgrade to the new version and when to wait for a future revision.

New Features and Changes

The new 2.2.0 version is not just an updated release of an existing tree; much of the code is new or has been heavily improved and extended to provide additional functionality, or to extend or simplify existing features.

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