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Mandriva 2010: Meh

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Mandriva isn't as popular as it once was. There was a time when a Mandriva (then Mandrake) release was as important as the latest and greatest from Redhat or SuSE. Lately (at least in my little corner of the world) Mandriva has just been sort of a "Meh" distribution.

It's a shame, really, because when I first got started with Linux, Mandrake was far and above more polished and gave a much friendlier experience to the end user than any other distribution.

Will 2010 regain that excitement with me? Only an install will tell. I downloaded Mandriva One KDE edition, because traditionally Mandriva has been KDE-centric, and I still think that's where most of their polish work goes.

Rest Here




Love how he doesn't allow comments...

If he wanted something specific like certain games installed, he could have used the actual install CD, Mandriva Free, instead of a LiveCD version. Then, he could specify during installation what additional packages he wanted. It's his fault for using the wrong version.

Mandriva 2010 is very pretty, and very nice. I'm blown away by the polish. There have been a few hiccups, but updates have been flying off the servers as they've been hard at work squashing any bugs popping up.

re: Free

Well, actually, the package selection seems to have been removed from the Free install DVD as well (unless I overlooked it). All you really get to do is pick your desktop. But then I guess they figure that's what rpmdrake is for. That's why the One versions are adequate because you can install what you want after system install.

And One is better cuz they come with proprietary drivers and Flash and stuff that is left out of Free. I did an install of each, Free with KDE and One with GNOME, and man, Mandriva's GNOME is gorgeous. I don't normally even like GNOME. In fact, I wasn't gonna install One, I just needed a nice installer shot and thought I'd show the other big desktop, but after I saw it, I installed it to play around in.

To each his own. Techiemoe doesn't really like too much. He leans towards the negative with any distro.

Well Techiemoe's review was

Well Techiemoe's review was interesting but I think I'll wait for TechieCurly and TechieLarry's review before I can make any additional comments. Nyuk Nyuk Big Grin

re: Techiemoe's review

augh, wise guy eh?

Techiemoe is so stupid

Techiemoe is so stupid not to see that Mandriva is the only to get it right: «installing updates prompted me for my regular user password, but running Add/Remove asked me for the root password» -- and he is «confused» by that!

This is how ALL the Linux distros should do it!
-- Updating the ALREADY INSTALLED packages is a user business.
-- ADDING/REMOVING packages is an administrator business.

With such stupid users, no wonder the distro makers are stupid too.

what a terrible review

His whole review of an entire operating system was based on a small issue with an installation survey and his own confusion over Mandriva's correct handling of permissions. The fact that the artwork is the best of any Linux distro - period, the package manager is the best yet, the system is fast, or that it has flawless support for multiple desktop environments has somehow flown over his lofty head. I used to read his reviews faithfully, but I'm beginning to think that they have the news value of someone passing gas. Techiemoe is full of hot air.

Permissions

I agree with the rest of you about permissions. I think Mandy has the correct permissions. I absolutely hate Ubuntu's permission scheme, using the user password for root permissions on everything.

re: Permissions

In GNOME on Ubuntu, you can change that behavior for graphical apps requiring root-level permissions by toggling the /apps/gksu/sudo-mode gconf key off.

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