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Head to Head: Google Chrome 4 Beta vs. Firefox 3.6

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

In the last couple of days, both Google's Chrome browser and Mozilla's Firefox have come out with new betas claiming improved performance. Why not compare these new betas head-to-head?

I decided to pit the latest Firefox 3.6 beta against the latest Chrome 4.0 beta, testing startup and SunSpider JavaScript performance times. I tested on a non-state-of-the-art Athlon dual-core running at 2GHz with 2GB RAM. I also turned off all unnecessary processes in Windows Task Manager, and ran the tests thrice and took the averages.

Here are my results:




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