Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Organizing Files

Filed under
Linux

The problem: the filesystem on my Unix workstation was a mess. I couldn't find anything without grepping all over creation. About half the time, I'd actually find something useful. Usually I'd get no hits at all, or I'd match something like a compiled binary and end up hosing my display beyond belief.

I wrote this from a Unix/Linux perspective, but Mac users running a recent version of the operating system should be able to make sense of it. Here are some terms for non-Unix types:

*A Unix home directory is the equivalent of wherever you keep most of your working files. The tilde (~) is just shorthand for that directory, as is $HOME.
*The cat command displays a file to your screen.
*Folder names use / instead of \ as separators.

What Didn't Work

This is what didn't do the trick.

Full Story.

some solutions

If you have this much trouble managing files, try using Mac OS 10.4 or wait for KDE 4. You could also try to set up a database with keywords or hyperlink them together with web pages. I work with all my own stuff and have found a system that works, but this requires organizational ability and has no easy answers except the before mentioned software.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

NASA Space App Challenger Runs Yocto on an Intel Edison-Based Nanosat

NASA has long had an interest in Linux and other open source technologies, and has used Linux in a variety of systems, including the R2 humanoid robot now at work at the International Space Station. With its International NASA Space App Challenge, the space agency is tapping into the maker gestalt to come up with new ideas, as well as inspire future space engineers. In this year's two-day Space App Challenge hackathon, which ran April 10-11 in 133 cities around the world, NASA greeted participants with over 25 challenges split into Earth, Outer Space, Humans, and Robotics categories. Read more

How to Find the Best Open Source Project to Work On

In my last article for Linux.com, I explored a few ways newcomers to open source projects can get started. While there are many resources to explore open source project communities, choosing which project to contribute to can still be a quite daunting task. You could go searching in the more than 23 million repositories on GitHub, the world’s largest source code hosting platform. But there are better ways. This article is meant to be a short guide to help novice open source practitioners more easily identify the first project they’d like to contribute to. Read more

Dell Is Telling Customers to Try a New OS, Ubuntu

Dell has been moving a lot of interesting moves lately and it's focusing on the Linux side of the business, which can only be a good thing for the open source platform. Read more

Linux 4.1 Kernel Benchmarks With An Intel Core i7 IVB System

Yesterday I ran some fresh tests of Intel Ivy Bridge on the latest Mesa Git code to see if the performance has changed much recently for the slightly-older generation of Intel HD Graphics. Today I've done some similar tests in kernel-space with the Linux 4.1 kernel. I ran benchmarks from the same Core i7 3770K system while testing the vanilla Linux 3.19, 4.0, and 4.1 Git kernels and running various graphics tests to see if there's been any recent i915 DRM kernel changes affecting the Ivy Bridge graphics performance. Read more