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comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3"

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KDE
Software

There is small trend currently to write a blog entry or article comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3". Now, I'm not involved in the least with the GNOME 3 efforts (no big surprise there, I'm sure) so I can't and won't comment on what they are doing now or in the future (they can do so themselves quite well), but there are two interesting points I keep seeing raised that I really do want to address ... and I don't feel like commenting on every blog post out there. Wink

KDE 4 .. or the KDE Workspace?

What these blog entries are usually comparing is not "KDE 4" with "GNOME 3" but two of the KDE 4 workspace components, Plasma and KWin, with gnome-shell. Little more than that is compared in most of them when the topic is "KDE 4 or GNOME 3?". This is unfortunate because KDE 4 is a lot more than just the KDE Workspace, which is just one product that comes from KDE, just as GNOME 3 will be more than just gnome-shell.

A primary example is the KDE development platform. It consists of KDE's libraries built on top of Qt, Akonadi, Nepomuk/Strigi and others and represents one of the most important products we create. This platform started back in the 90s as a means to an end: getting the KDE desktop workspace functioning and sharing code and functionality efficiently between KDE apps in a way that guaranteed some consistency. These days, while it has kept this same set of purposes as an important part of its mission, the KDE development platform has taken on a much bigger role and a life of its own.

I'd love to see some thoughts that extend beyond Plasma/KWin out there and look at things such as the maturity of KDE's development platform compared to what others are offering right now or, as in the case of GNOME 3, in the near future.

Rest Here




Gnome 3

I sure hope Gnome developer don't mess up Gnome like the KDE developers did with KDE.

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