Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AMD Radeon HD 5750/5770

Filed under
Hardware

In late September AMD had introduced the Radeon HD 5850 and Radeon HD 5870 graphics cards as the successors to the Radeon HD 4850 and Radeon HD 4870, respectively. These graphics cards, which are part of the Evergreen GPU family, have been performing quite nicely according to reports, but we have yet to test either of these Cypress graphics cards under Linux. Today though AMD is introducing the first midrange graphics cards in the Evergreen family. Under the Juniper codename, the Radeon HD 5750 and HD 5770 are being launched with both graphics cards being quite similar except for the ATI Radeon HD 5770 shipping with slightly higher core and memory clocks along with a different heatsink. In this review we have the first Linux-based benchmarks of these two new graphics cards, which are also the first publicized Linux benchmarks from any AMD Evergreen graphics processor.

The Radeon HD 5000 series graphics processors introduce support for Microsoft DirectX 11. Of course, to a Linux user this does not mean much, but this is one of the areas being heavily publicized by AMD in their marketing material. The Radeon HD 5000 series though is compatible with OpenGL 3.2. Some of the other features that are shared between the HD 5700 and HD 5800 series are ATI Eyefinity, Stream Technology, OpenCL, TeraScale2, PCI Express 2.1 x16, and UVD2. While AMD has shown a 24-monitor Eyefinity setup on Linux, the support has yet to arrive in their proprietary Catalyst Linux driver. The Unified Video Decoder 2 (UVD2) support with ATI Avivo HD may also be ignored by Linux users at this time, as we have been talking about the X-Video Bitstream Acceleration (XvBA) for a year now and it still has yet to be usable by ATI Radeon customers, but it finally will be in the very near future. UVD2 in ATI Radeon hardware will finally mean something on Linux, but we will have to wait to share more until permitted.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Games Leftovers

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Adds Retpoline Mitigations for Spectre & Meltdown

Continuing Red Hat's promise of 10-year lifecycle support for its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 operating system series, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 update addresses critical security fixes and other important issues that might have an impact on businesses. Therefore, it is recommended to update to this release as soon as possible. "Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 marks the transition from the Maintenance Support 1 lifecycle phase to the Maintenance Support 2 phase," says Red Hat. "In order to help provide customers with a stable environment for the remainder of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 lifecycle, only critical security fixes and business-impacting urgent issues have been addressed." Read more Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Released With Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

Google’s Fuchsia Adds Emulator for Running Linux Apps

Google has added a Guest app to its emergent and currently open source Fuchsia OS to enable Linux apps to run within Fuchsia as a virtual machine (VM). The Guest app makes use of a library called Machina that permits closer integration with the OS than is available with typical emulators, according to a recent 9to5Google story. Last month, Google announced a Project Crostini technology that will soon let Chromebook users more easily run mainstream Linux applications within a Chrome OS VM. This week, Acer’s Chromebook Flip C101 joined the short list of Chromebooks that will offer Linux support later this year. Read more

Today in Techrights