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More on Linus, KDE, and GNOME

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Linux

It all started, like most family fights, with a little incident that was blown out of proportion.

Till Kamppeter, a developer for Mandriva, innocently asked for help on the GNOME usability list on how to make GNOME printing options reflect a given's printer full range of functionality.

Kamppeter is a printing and imaging expert who was one of the people who went to the recent OSDL Desktop Summit to help figure out how to make the Linux desktop a lot more successful than it is currently.

Frederic Crozat, a GNOME packager/maintainer at Mandriva, replied, according to Kamppeter, that, "the usability team of GNOME was against listing (the full printer's) options (because) they clutter the dialog and can be more confusing than useful to the user."

Torvalds then chimed in:, "This 'users are idiots, and are confused by functionality' mentality of Gnome is a disease. If you think your users are idiots, only idiots will use it. I don't use Gnome, because in striving to be simple, it has long since reached the point where it simply doesn't do what I need it to do."

"Please, just tell people to use KDE," Torvalds concluded.

Full Story.

Good article

I remember when we found out he was using Suse a few years ago and when he said he was not against DRM per say. Each person has their preferences and I might not have the same requirements as Linus has since I am a web designer, writer, artist, and philosopher not a developer. That is the beauty of open source and the X-Windows model of interface design.

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