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Dreaming Again with One Laptop Per Child

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OLPC

Recently I stumbled upon this article "One Laptop Per Child - The Dream is Over". Short sentences and big conclusions. A fatalistic view of OLPC. The dream is over? Great. Welcome to reality, and the reality is that many people from the OLPC community are contributing with nice results.

Predicting that a dream will vanish is cheap, getting consideration for what replaced the dream is priceless. OLPC is changing the world in ways that where not predictable when the dream started. So let's first admit a few facts, then tackle the errors and misunderstandings of UNdispatch's article.

Did OLPC revolutionize the education system in the developing world?
Developed countries try very hard to understand what digital revolution they need for their education systems. Many of the ideas that OLPC has brought to the developing world are those that we hear nowadays in our schools. So yes, OLPC has revolutionized education in the developing world by revolutionizing education worldwide, and by giving a chance for developing countries to be part of this.

OLPC changed the world by giving children a chance to change our world. With this in mind, I've got enough to dream about.

rest here




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