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DesktopBSD 1.7

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Although the official name of this blog is Desktop Linux Reviews, we will occasionally be looking at non-Linux operating systems too. Such is the case with DesktopBSD 1.7 which is a version of the FreeBSD operating system. DesktopBSD is, as you can tell from its name, geared toward desktop users.

Unfortunately, according to the DesktopBSD site this will be the last and final release of DesktopBSD. While I’m very sorry to hear that, I think it’s worth looking at DesktopBSD if for no other reason then to give the DesktopBSD developer a pat on the back and a thank you for making the effort to create it in the first place.

Here’s a list of some of what’s new in this release of DesktopBSD 1.7:

FreeBSD 7.2 as stable and secure base system
KDE 3.5.10 as mature and easy-to-use desktop environment 3.1.1 as feature-rich office suite
Pre-installed Java SE 6 environment
X.Org release 7.4 with extensive graphics support
Large number of enhancements and fixes

rest here

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