Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Five Features We Want to See in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu isn't the only Linux operating system, but it's where the dream of a usable, completely free desktop is closest to reality. If every Ubuntu developer were assembled at one place, here are five things we'd ask them to accomplish.

An App Store better than Apple's

One of Linux's most touted advantages over Windows and Mac systems is that, on distributed systems like Ubuntu, you can install thousands of applications right from your system, without having to Google, download, double-click, and Next, Next, Next through installation screens. That advantage is lost if you put all your applications in a big pile of searchable stuff labeled "Graphics" or "Sound & Video"—or, even worse, ask users to copy-paste repository sources and installation commands into text files and terminals. Those are great backup and uber-geek solutions, but terribly off-putting to those just trying to get a system up and working.

New users are coming to Linux looking for their Windows or Mac equivalents—Photoshop, iTunes, Winamp, AIM—and they're wondering what other users like them recommend in very particular areas. Create a clean, tagged, search-friendly database of everything that runs on a standard Ubuntu desktop.

Integrate dual-booting and virtualization

rest here




More in Tux Machines

A Grand Experiment

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data? I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio. But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.) Read more Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Karbonn confirms Android One smartphone(s) launching in Q1 next year

In an interview with TOI Tech, Karbonn Mobiles has confirmed it will be introducing new Android One-based smartphone(s) early next year. Karbonn's Managing Director Pradeep Jain said the company is in talks with Google for Android One, and we might see some Android One smartphone launch(es) in Q1 of next year. Read more

COM and Pico-ITX dev kit run Linux on dual-core Cortex-A7

iWave has launched a rugged, SODIMM-style COM and Pico-ITX form factor carrier board that run Linux on the Renesas dual-core, Cortex-A7 RZ/G1E SoC. In January, iWave launched the iW-RainboW-G20M-Qseven computer-on-module, built around the dual-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 based Renesas RZ/G1M and RZ/G1N SoCs. Now the company has followed up with a 67.6 x 37mm, SODIMM form factor “iW-RainboW-G22M-SM” COM that runs Linux 3.10.31 on the dual-core Cortex-A7 based RZ/G1E SoC from the same RZ/G series SoCs. Read more