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The sophist and the open source baking farce

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OSS

One of the biggest threats to open source software has arisen from a most unlikely place - the food and beverage industry. Steve Gundrum, CEO of food engineering house Mattson, has teamed with sophist and celebrity author Malcolm Gladwell to bastardize the fundamental concepts behind open source software development, turning the OSS idea into nothing more than another term for inefficient collaboration.

Worse, the two gentlemen have opened a huge front for proprietary software advocates to rally around the cry that open source is just a trendy fad. And they did all this simply by baking a cookie.

Full Story.

Huh?

"biggest threats to open source software".... Huh?

Only if you buy into their premise "baking cookies" = "software programming". In that case might I interest you in "hitting head with hammer" = "sexy and fun".

The masses will always be morons (hence the ability for articles like this to get published). If this is "the biggest threat to open source", wake me up when something serious happens (like if Torvalds gets a hair cut).

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