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What’s New in Ubuntu 9.10

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Ubuntu

WorksWithU reported a couple weeks ago on new features in Ubuntu 9.10, like kernel mode setting and GRUB 2, that are likely to please geeks. But Ubunti 9.10 (codenamed Karmic Koala) will also sport changes aimed at traditional users. Here’s a look at a few of them.

They include…

Ubuntu One

Perhaps the hardest-to-miss addition to Ubuntu 9.10 is the Ubuntu One client, which comes installed by default under the Applications>Internet menu. The application allows registered users to share files between Ubuntu computers by simply dragging and dropping them into a folder in their home directory, or through a web interface.

I was impressed with how seamlessly Ubuntu One worked in Ubuntu 9.10, given the alpha/beta status of both pieces of software. Signing up for the free Ubuntu One plan, which offers 2 gigabytes of online storage, was a snap, and file sharing worked seamlessly even on a flaky wireless connection. I’m still processing my thoughts on other aspects of Ubuntu One and hope to dedicate a post to it soon.

Goodbye Pidgin, hello Empathy

rest here




Whats new in Ubuntu?

Ubuntu Bug Stats as 8.20-09

* Open (60697) +609 over last week
* Critical (28) +1 over last week
* Unconfirmed (28316) +350 over last week
* Unassigned (52346) +558 over last week <---- nobody looking at these?
* All bugs ever reported (303196) +1977 over last week

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