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Is Chrome OS Too Orwellian Or Big Brother-ish?

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Google

We’ve talked and complained about Google on many other occasions within this blog, but with many discussions of Google also comes discussions of privacy, and the fact that Google aims to distribute an operating system should be no different - that is to say, not only is Google open to almost everything we do on the Internet, but the giant will also be the only thing sitting between users and hardware with Chrome OS.

“Let us handle your data”

I can’t be the only person bothered by this - Google Docs aims to own your documents, Google Maps wants to know where you are and where you are going (or even looking at), and now Google Chrome OS wants everything that you don’t put on the Internet.

I’m no conspiracy theorist, I swear. I don’t think Google tries to be evil (though they missed a pretty good chance), and I don’t think they sit there all sweaty and peering at all the private data they collect from users. But they do have it, don’t they?

rest here




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