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New Interface for Ubuntu Netbook Remix

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Ubuntu

After Updating my Dell Mini 9 to the alpha 3 release of Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala last night and running all the updates, I was treated to a completely new UI for netbook-launcher.

It's still unstable, but personally I think its an improvement to the last version which is high praise considering I think the current UI of the Netbook Remix in 9.04 is the most usable netbook interface on the market today.

Netbook Remix Ubuntu 9.10 alpha-3 (Aug 8th 2009)




UNR New User Interface

ubuntumini.com: Ubuntu Netbook Remix's user interface is receiving a redesign for Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala.

More here

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