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Developers threaten to leave CentOS

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Linux

This is an Open Letter to Lance Davis from fellow CentOS Developers

It is regrettable that we are forced to send this letter but we are left with no other options. For some time now we have been attempting to resolve these problems:

You seem to have crawled into a hole ... and this is not acceptable.

You have long promised a statement of CentOS project funds; to this date this has not appeared.

You hold sole control of the centos.org domain with no deputy; this is not proper.

You have, it seems, sole 'Founders' rights in the IRC channels with no deputy ; this is not proper.

When I (Russ) try to call the phone numbers for UK Linux, and for you individually, I get a telco intercept 'Lines are temporarily busy' for the last two weeks. Finally yesterday, a voicemail in your voice picked up, and I left a message urgently requesting a reply. Karanbir also reports calling and leaving messages without your reply.

Please do not kill CentOS through your fear of shared management of the project.

Clearly the project dies if all the developers walk away.

Please contact me, or any other signer of this letter at once, to arrange for the required information to keep the project alive at the 'centos.org' domain.

Sincerely,

Russ Herrold
Ralph Angenendt
Karanbir Singh
Jim Perrin
Donavan Nelson
Tim Verhoeven
Tru Huynh
Johnny Hughes

Posted Here




what bothered me within the CentOS project

dag.wieers.com: Now that the cat is out of the bag I can discuss one part of what bothered me within the CentOS project for more than 2 years. Something which was unknown to outsiders, but also not discussable inside of the project because of the fear of the repercussions of bringing up this topic during a meeting. If you cannot discuss, you cannot fix.

The CentOS project does not have any recurring expenses, the project works with volunteers. And those volunteers pay with their own time, their own resources and sometimes travel expenses (for those who joined one of the promotion events). The project does get hardware and bandwidth donations and they are very valuable. In the end there is no need for money to keep the project running as-is.

But that of course does not mean that money couldn't help grow the project and that is why (I think) initially when the project was set up there was an effort to raise money. Google adsense, sponsorship on the website and even Paypal donations from users. How much, I cannot say because I don't know. I heard some vague numbers, likely in the 4 digits EUR range per month but real figures are only known by one person.

rest here

Growing unrest within the CentOS project

h-online.com: Several well-known developers within the CentOS project have published an open letter to Lance Davis. Davis is one of the founders of the project which releases the Linux distribution, a free clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

According to the letter, Davis holds numerous key positions, but has been inactive and unreachable for quite some time. There are no deputies for some of the areas he controls. Davis reportedly offered to provide a statement of the CentOS project's funds but hasn't done so – although he is the only one who has access to the project's Google AdSense and PayPal accounts. These accounts provide the funds to meet the project's running costs.

rest here

Red Hat Enterprise clone poised to 'die'

theregister.co.uk: According to six concerned CentOS developers, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux clone is poised on the edge of the abyss.

In an open letter posted to the CentOS website and the project mailing list, six fellow developers accuse project co-founder Lance Davis of putting the entire project at risk by disappearing from everyday involvement without ceding control to others.

"You seem to have crawled into a hole...and this is not acceptable," the letter reads. "Please do not kill CentOS through your fear of shared management of the project."

rest here

re: CentOS

Sad but foreseeable when programmer dorks attempt to play project manager.

Luckily Scientific Linux is basically the same thing (better in some cases) and run by some major brain trusts.

Plus they actually have a LiveCD that you can Install from - no really they do! (seems like a odd point to make - but the CentOS dev's never thought it was important to actually be able to INSTALL from a liveCD).

Mismanagement seemed to be the norm, which is unfortunate, but started to be obvious when it took two plus years of waffling over a new community support forum app and STILL nothing (except more user bitching) was ever accomplished.

It's a shame when the

It's a shame when the indians all want to be chief.

The Lance Davis Scandal

Beranger has found lots more links on the subject for those interested HERE

Also: CentOS team responds to community reaction

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