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The secret of Firefox's success

Filed under
Software

On the one hand, you have the Microsoft Internet Explorer with hundreds of millions of PR dollars and a mega-monopoly behind it, and on the other, a relatively small, open source application run by a handful of individuals.

People-power has arrived, a reality the entertainment and software cartels in particular are having painfully and forcefully thrust upon them.

Mitchell Baker runs Mozilla and she believes in "the once-radical notion that software should be written cooperatively and freely shared," says a story in the Mercury News.

There's no doubt Mozilla has been, and still is, coolly and calculatingly exploiting the Net as a sales and promotion tool. Or it thinks it is. The advertising industry calls it viral marketing. But the ad folks didn't create it. They're just cashing in on an existing Net phenomenon which they've had to label. Otherwise they couldn't sell it.

But Firefox is doing well only because Jane and John Doe like it: it's neat and it has cool hooks. And vitally important, it isn't Microsoft. And that's what they're telling each other. And they'd still have been talking about it without any help from the marketeers. P2p direct. Email, IM, chats, posts on sites, mobiles of various kinds. You name it.

Full Story.

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