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Google makes promise it cannot keep

So Google reckons that it can provide the perfect operating system in Chrome, even to the point where according to Google's Engineering Director, Linus Upson, it will herald the end of malware. That's what he went on the record to say, promising that Google was "completely redesigning the underlying security architecture of the OS so that users don't have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates." Which could just end up being one of those 'why did I say that' moments that go down in software development folklore. Not least because as soon as you say something is 100 percent secure, is malware-proof then out of the woodwork crawl all the bad people just itching to prove you wrong.

One application vulnerability specialist, Richard Kirk of Fortify Software, told us "You can have the most bug-free operating system in the world – which is what energy companies have in the shape of the SCADA-compliant embedded firmware that drives their critical systems - but if the software has bugs in it, you're dead in the water."

rest here




Sounds more like Ubuntu fud

Sounds more like Ubuntu fud to me. Their bloogers are trying their best to talk ChromeOS down.

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