Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Possible Future of Linux - Online Live Environments?

Some months ago I casually signed up for a beta program online that seemed to mix cloud computing with Linux distributions. This program being SUSE Studio. I was impressed by the concept and I took it for a brief whirl. It is quite powerful and apart from adding packages from the regular openSUSE repositories of the latest stable release version, you can add/remove your own repos. Furthermore, you can customize the artwork and share this custom distribution with the world. You can watch this video to see how to use SUSE Studio to build a custom Linux distribution based on openSUSE.

After a while, SUSE Studio got me thinking. What if the future of building Linux distributions for the casual user could be based on an application like this? Now I fully understand that SUSE Studio is backed by Novell and hence no ordinary unpaid manpower has gone into the development of this application. I'm not entirely sure how easy it would be to start such a project from scratch so I won't go there. Of course, this doesn't mean something like this can't be considered. I'm sure a lot of people consider creating their own Linux distribution just for fun and to get their hands dirty. Those more serious about it would look to target a certain audience - casual new users or music enthusiasts, for example. So instead of going about with Linux From Scratch or basing your distribution on Ubuntu, I think the 'daring developer' in you should tempt you to try building something like SUSE Studio.

So how would you, the creator of such an application for generating Linux distributions go about it?

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Watch: Mark Shuttleworth's Keynote at the OpenStack Summit 2015

As expected, Canonical was present at the OpenStack Summit 2015 event that took place in Vancouver, British Columbia between May 18-22. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Going Free/Open Source

  • Twitter Kit and Digits for Android go open source
    With a swarm of developers from around the world converging on San Francisco’s Moscone Center tomorrow for Google I/O, Twitter wants them to keep the company’s real-time social platform at the top of mind. This afternoon it announced that its developer tools for integrating Twitter into Android apps have been open-sourced, with the projects now hosted publicly on Github.
  • First Look Publishes Open Source Code To Advance Privacy, Security, and Journalism
    The Intercept and its publisher First Look Media strongly believe in the benefits of free and open source software — in part because we rely on such software every day. To keep our journalists and sources safe, we use secure communication tools like the data-encryption system GnuPG, the Off-the-Record secure messaging protocol, the SecureDrop communications platform, and the secure calling and texting app Signal. To publish on the web, we use the GNU/Linux operating system; the Apache web server; OpenSSL, a web encryption library; WordPress, the open-source blogging engine; and Piwik, which tracks web traffic. The list goes on.
  • Google Makes The Roboto Typeface Open Source
    With Ice Cream Sandwich, Google introduced Roboto to the world. Since then, the family (designed by Googler Christian Robertson) has expanded to include a set of slab serif fonts, and has even seen a major revision introduced with Android 5.0 last year.

Tiny SODIMM-style COM runs Linux on Atmel Cortex-A5 SoC

Ka-Ro’s SODIMM-style “TXA5″ COM runs Linux on Atmel’s SAMA5D42 SoC, offers Ethernet, LCD, USB, GPIO, and serial I/O, and supports industrial temperatures. The TXA5 is the first Atmel-based member of the Ka-Ro Electronics family of “TX” COMs. Most of Ka-Ro’s COMs have used Freescale processors, and many have been sold under the Strategic Test label, including the i.MX283-based TX-28S from 2012. Read more